Directory of Smoking Styles, Poses and Tricks

Trends, habits, teenage to mature, pregnancy, other matters.
Previous topicNext topic
User avatar
Dan
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 1563
Joined: Tue Apr 26, 2022 5:52 pm
Location: UK
Gender: Male
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 12 times

Directory of Smoking Styles, Poses and Tricks

Post by Dan »

Post by Dan on Sept 29, 2020 17:01:55 GMT

Directory of Smoking Styles, Poses and Tricks

* Text Version (see below for gallery version)

Introduction
This is a subject I've wanted to do a piece about since the start of this forum, perhaps even years before that. You see, the culture of women smoking is very diverse, and what is good for one isnt necessarily good for another. I have observed perhaps thousands of smoking styles over the years, and no two styles are ever the same. The terminology to describe this phenomenon isnt largely well known on the internet, and there is no directory of jargon you can list on google to find out the answer. So this is an attempt to cover this format and see what we can discover. I'll also try to describe what is happening at each stage, so women can learn them and master them.

Why choose to experiment? It can often feel sensually stimulating to smoke in different ways, and this can also seem attractive to men. Lets face it, most women in the world smoke casually and rather unattractively, and this can work in the opposite way in terms of attractiveness. Women have learned to embrace some extra pleasure from smoking, just by doing things a certain way. Call it the Chi of smoking. We call these exclusive moves Styles, Poses and Tricks; which is the art form of women's smoking culture. This is a way to add extra pleasure, and an extra boost of comfort, and style. Also seduction, which men find attractive. Yes, if you look as though you are really enjoying yourself, perhaps even giving pleasure to yourself, men will be drawn towards your radiant character; like an aphrodisiac. Smoking is only only tool women can use to seduce men, and you can imagine why some women find this interesting and exciting, rather adventurous; and more interesting than sitting in a corner nervously puffing.


Dangles
Holding the cigarette in your mouth unsupported.

Center Hold
Holding a cig hands free from the middle of the mouth.

Center Dangle, Drooped
Holding the tip of a cig hands free from the middle of the mouth, and letting gravity pull the cig down. Many women use the bottom lip to support or cushion the cig at this stage. It is most often used before lighting up.

Side Shot, Common Dangle
Most men and most women like to hold the cig slightly to the side of the mouth, known as the common dangle.

Corner Dangle
Not so many women use this as their normal style, unless they happen to be in a certain profession. Some women use this pose as they rummage around for a lighter, or when trying to avoid smoke drifting into the eyes.

Supported Dangle
The most common pose during a light up, where the normal center drooped dangle is then supported by the fingers.

Lifted Dangle
When the normal center dangle is lifted by the bottom lip, usually during light up.

Hands free Dangle
Where the cig rests in the lips unsupported after lighting up. See Dangle Draw.

Chimney Dangle
With the head tilted fully back but the cig is slightly drooped.

Bent Over, leaning or Study Dangle
Tipping the head forwards, learning or bend over something, which makes the cig go vertical, straight down. If the cig is lit this instantly makes smoke drift into your eyes. I've seen women use this when tying shoe laces, collecting mail, or bending over to do something. Hence the more uncommon Study Dangle.



Draws
To draw smoke in to your mouth.

Dangle (Hands free) Draw
To draw smoke from an unsupported dangling cig.

Supported Draw
To draw smoke in to your mouth, supported by the fingers. This can be any position or angle (corner, side, common or center)

Lifted Draw
To lift the cig with the bottom lip as you draw.

Lifted Side Draw
To lift the cig with the bottom lip from the side of the mouth as you draw.

Pull Down, or Chimney Draw
To tilt the head backwards, and lift the cig with the bottom lip, so that it goes vertical - pointing straight up. Most often used when lying down.

Bent Over, leaning or Study Draw
To draw while the cig is vertically pointing down. Not very common but used after a period of leaning dangle.

The Deep Draw, or Drag
This word is added, and combined with any other draw, when the draw is long, sustained or deep. For example, a supported draw during light up could be followed by a (supported, dangle, lifted, chimney, leaning) deep draw or drag.

Cheek Hollowing
This is added when there is an extra deep or powerful draw, causing the cheeks to concave.

The Crackle
This is when a deep draw makes the end of cig get so hot that it crackles. This used to be common when cigs were less tightly rolled, but today it can take a lot to get a crackle. The side effect of this means the smoke will sizzle and be felt more tingling between the lips, which can be pleasurable.

The Kiss Draw
Women who wear lipstick sometimes pout the lips before taking in the cig, in an attempt to preserve their lipstick. This is the kiss draw, and is often seen outside of nightclubs, or when business women dont want to redo their makeup.



Inhales
To inhale the smoke in to your lungs after drawing.

Puff
To take a small bit of smoke and blow it out. This can be inhaled or not. Often seen as a small exhale during lightup.

Kiss Puff
Also known as 'kissing the cig goodbye'. Often seen at the end of the cigs life, when the smoker repeatedly kisses small amounts from the often hot filer.

Common Inhale
To breath in after drawing, allowing the reservoir of smoke in the mouth to gush down to be drunk by the lungs.

Open Mouth Inhale
To open the mouth after the draw, to cool the smoke, then inhaling.

Direct Inhale
To breath in during drawing, causing the smoke to go into the lungs directly, and without needing a separate inhale.

Snap
After the draw, the smoke is allowed to escape into a small bubble, which is cooled outside of the mouth, and then quickly drawn back in.

Balloon Snap
After a drag draw, the huge amount of smoke can be exhaled as a thick balloon, which is almost instantly inhaled.

French Inhale
To allow the smoke out of your mouth - a lot like a Snap. Only instead of breathing in the ball with your mouth, you take it in with the nose instead.

Figure 8 French Inhale
Not many women can do this. By allowing smoke out of the side of the mouth only, it makes two columns of smoke, which then drift up, and be inhaled by the nose. For a second, the smoke looks like it is joined under the nose, giving a figure of 8.

Overload, Residual Inhale
Sometimes the smoke escapes the mouth before the woman has had time to close it, causing a small cloud to escape. It means they tried to draw out more than their mouth could hold.

Drifted Inhale
Where quite a lot of smoke escapes the mouth before inhaling, and drifts up like a curtain.

Double Inhale
To draw, inhale, draw and inhale, before exhaling.

Multiple Inhales
To draw and inhale many times before exhaling.



Holds
To hold a cigarette with the fingers.

Casual Hold
To hold the lower part or filter of a cigarette, about an inch from the base, between the first (index, pointing) finger and the second (middle) finger.

Lifted Hold
To lift the cig at and angle, pointing upwards.

High Hold
To hold the middle stem of the cig. Usually women use this along with the 'T' Hold.

The 'T' Hold
Holding the cig in the middle of the stem. The fingers are pointing, while the cig rests horizontally, making a T shape.

The Crossover Hold
Similar to casual hold, but with fingers crossed over.

Tip/End Cover
To hold the lower part or filter of a cigarette, about an inch from the base, with the first and second fingers, while covering the tip with the thumb. This comes from a time of unfiltered cigarettes, when covering the tip made the cig burn more slowly.

Tip Hold
To hold the lower part or filter of a cigarette, about an inch from the base, with the first and second fingers, while using the third finger and thumb to grip the remaining base or filter.

Lower Fork Hold
To hold the lower part or filter of a cigarette, about an inch from the base, with the first and second fingers, but using the V of the fingers to hold it.

Pinch Hold
To hold the end, or base of the filter of a cigarette, holding with the first and second fingers and the thumb. Many men use this but women also find this pleasurable.



Exhales
To release the smoke from the lungs after inhaling.

Drift Exhale
To open the mouth after inhaling and letting the smoke drift out.

Curtain Drift
To open the mouth slightly after inhaling, and letting the smoke slowly out between the teeth, creating a curtain.

Open mouth exhale
To open the mouth after inhaling and breathing out naturally.

Posed, Common exhale
To open the mouth only slightly after inhaling, and breathing out naturally.

Blown exhale
To open the mouth after inhaling, wide enough to blow, and blowing the smoke out - usually in a wide cloud.

Pursed, or Tightly blown exhale
To purse the lips only wide enough to whistle, and blowing the smoke out as a tight stream.

Multiple Exhales
To open the lips after inhaling wide enough to blow out the smoke, but blowing it out is stages, stopping and continuing, until the lungs are empty.

Pursed Multiple Exhales
To open the lips after inhaling only wide enough to whistle, but blowing it out is stages, stopping and continuing, until the lungs are empty.

Nose Exhale
To inhale and then exhale using the nose, breathing out naturally.

Nose and Mouth exhales
To inhale and then exhale using the nose and mouth together.



Tricks
To do special things with the smoke.

Smoke Rings
Take a deep draw but dont inhale. Gather up all the smoke in your mouth. Let it sit in your cheeks for a second or two. Then, open your mouth and make your lips into a ring, or 'O' shape. Don't exhale, but simply push the smoke out of your mouth, in stages. You can do this clicking the jaw to make a small smoke ring appear. Flicking your cheek with your fingers, causing multiple smoke rings. Or by opening and closing your throat. This can take a lot of practice.

Chain Lightups
To light a cig using the burning embers of another cig.

Smoking with large breasts
Not much to practice here, if you got em, flaunt em.




------------


* Gallery Version


Dangles
Holding the cigarette in your mouth unsupported.

Center Hold
Holding a cig hands free from the middle of the mouth.

Bitten Center Hold
Holding from the center of the mouth but bitten between the teeth. Often seen before lighting.
Image

Center Dangle, Drooped
Holding the tip of a cig hands free from the middle of the mouth, and letting gravity pull the cig down. Many women use the bottom lip to support or cushion the cig at this stage. It is most often used before lighting up.
Image


Side Shot, Common Dangle
Most men and most women like to hold the cig slightly to the side of the mouth, known as the common dangle.
Image


Corner Dangle
Not so many women use this as their normal style, unless they happen to be in a certain profession. Some women use this pose as they rummage around for a lighter, or when trying to avoid smoke drifting into the eyes.
ImageImage


Supported Dangle
The most common pose during a light up, where the normal center drooped dangle is then supported by the fingers.
Image

Lifted Dangle
When the normal center dangle is lifted by the bottom lip, usually during light up.
Image

Hands free Dangle
Where the cig rests in the lips unsupported after lighting up. See Dangle Draw.
Image

Chimney Dangle
With the head tilted fully back but the cig is slightly drooped.

Bent Over, leaning or Study Dangle
Tipping the head forwards, learning or bend over something, which makes the cig go vertical, straight down. If the cig is lit this instantly makes smoke drift into your eyes. I've seen women use this when tying shoe laces, collecting mail, or bending over to do something. Hence the more uncommon Study Dangle.
Image




Draws
To draw smoke in to your mouth.

Dangle (Hands free) Draw
To draw smoke from an unsupported dangling cig.
Image

Supported Draw
To draw smoke in to your mouth, supported by the fingers. This can be any position or angle (corner, side, common or center)
Image

Lifted Draw
To lift the cig so you draw downwards at an angle.
Image
Image

Hands Free Lifted Draw
To lift the cig with the bottom lip as you draw.


Lifted Side Draw
To lift the cig with the bottom lip from the side of the mouth as you draw.
Image

Pull Down, or Chimney Draw
To tilt the head backwards, and lift the cig with the bottom lip, so that it goes vertical - pointing straight up. Most often used when lying down.
Image

Bent Over, leaning or Study Draw
To draw while the cig is vertically pointing down. Not very common but used after a period of leaning dangle.

The Deep Draw, or Drag
This word is added, and combined with any other draw, when the draw is long, sustained or deep. For example, a supported draw during light up could be followed by a (supported, dangle, lifted, chimney, leaning) deep draw or drag.
Image

Cheek Hollowing
This is added when there is an extra deep or powerful draw, causing the cheeks to concave.



The Crackle
This is when a deep draw makes the end of cig get so hot that it crackles. This used to be common when cigs were less tightly rolled, but today it can take a lot to get a crackle. The side effect of this means the smoke will sizzle and be felt more tingling between the lips, which can be pleasurable.
Image

The Kiss Draw
Women who wear lipstick sometimes pout the lips before taking in the cig, in an attempt to preserve their lipstick. This is the kiss draw, and is often seen outside of nightclubs, or when business women dont want to redo their makeup.





Inhales
To inhale the smoke in to your lungs after drawing.

Puff
To take a small bit of smoke and blow it out. This can be inhaled or not. Often seen as a small exhale during lightup.
Image

Kiss Puff
Also known as 'kissing the cig goodbye'. Often seen at the end of the cigs life, when the smoker repeatedly kisses small amounts from the often hot filer.

Common Inhale
To breath in after drawing, allowing the reservoir of smoke in the mouth to gush down to be drunk by the lungs.

Open Mouth Inhale
To open the mouth after the draw, to cool the smoke, then inhaling.
Image

Direct Inhale
To breath in during drawing, causing the smoke to go into the lungs directly, and without needing a separate inhale.

Snap
After the draw, the smoke is allowed to escape into a small bubble, which is cooled outside of the mouth, and then quickly drawn back in.
Image

Balloon Snap
After a drag draw, the huge amount of smoke can be exhaled as a thick balloon, which is almost instantly inhaled.
Image

French Inhale
To allow the smoke out of your mouth - a lot like a Snap. Only instead of breathing in the ball with your mouth, you take it in with the nose instead.
Image


Figure 8 French Inhale
Not many women can do this. By allowing smoke out of the side of the mouth only, it makes two columns of smoke, which then drift up, and be inhaled by the nose. For a second, the smoke looks like it is joined under the nose, giving a figure of 8.


Overload, Residual Inhale
Sometimes the smoke escapes the mouth before the woman has had time to close it, causing a small cloud to escape. It means they tried to draw out more than their mouth could hold.


Drifted, or Curtain Inhale
Where quite a lot of smoke escapes the mouth before inhaling, and drifts up like a curtain.
Image

Double Inhale
To draw, inhale, draw and inhale, before exhaling.

Multiple Inhales
To draw and inhale many times before exhaling.



Holds
To hold a cigarette with the fingers.

Casual Hold
To hold the lower part or filter of a cigarette, about an inch from the base, between the first (index, pointing) finger and the second (middle) finger.
Image

Lifted Hold
To lift the cig at and angle, pointing upwards.
Image

High Hold
To hold the middle stem of the cig. Usually women use this along with the 'T' Hold.
Image

The 'T' Hold
Holding the cig in the middle of the stem. The fingers are pointing, while the cig rests horizontally, making a T shape.
Image

The Crossover Hold
Similar to casual hold, but with fingers crossed over.


Tip/End Cover
To hold the lower part or filter of a cigarette, about an inch from the base, with the first and second fingers, while covering the tip with the thumb. This comes from a time of unfiltered cigarettes, when covering the tip made the cig burn more slowly.
Image

Tip Hold
To hold the lower part or filter of a cigarette, about an inch from the base, with the first and second fingers, while using the third finger and thumb to grip the remaining base or filter.

Lower Fork Hold
To hold the lower part or filter of a cigarette, about an inch from the base, with the first and second fingers, but using the V of the fingers to hold it.
Image

Pinch Hold
To hold the end, or base of the filter of a cigarette, holding with the first and second fingers and the thumb. Many men use this but women also find this pleasurable.



Exhales
To release the smoke from the lungs after inhaling.

Drift Exhale
To open the mouth after inhaling and letting the smoke drift out.
Image

Curtain Drift
To open the mouth slightly after inhaling, and letting the smoke slowly out between the teeth, and upwards, creating a curtain.
Image

Open mouth exhale
To open the mouth after inhaling and breathing out naturally.


Open Mouth Drift exhale
To open the mouth after inhaling and letting the smoke drift out horizontally. For Vertically, see Curtain Drift.
Image


Posed, Common exhale
To open the mouth only slightly after inhaling, and breathing out naturally.
Image

Blown exhale
To open the mouth after inhaling, wide enough to blow, and blowing the smoke out - usually in a wide cloud.
Image

Pursed, or Tightly blown exhale
To purse the lips only wide enough to whistle, and blowing the smoke out as a tight stream.

Multiple Exhales
To open the lips after inhaling wide enough to blow out the smoke, but blowing it out is stages, stopping and continuing, until the lungs are empty.

Pursed Multiple Exhales
To open the lips after inhaling only wide enough to whistle, but blowing it out is stages, stopping and continuing, until the lungs are empty.

Nose Exhale
To inhale and then exhale using the nose, breathing out naturally.

Nose and Mouth exhales
To inhale and then exhale using the nose and mouth together.



Tricks
To do special things with the smoke.

Smoke Rings
Take a deep draw but dont inhale. Gather up all the smoke in your mouth. Let it sit in your cheeks for a second or two. Then, open your mouth and make your lips into a ring, or 'O' shape. Don't exhale, but simply push the smoke out of your mouth, in stages. You can do this clicking the jaw to make a small smoke ring appear. Flicking your cheek with your fingers, causing multiple smoke rings. Or by opening and closing your throat. This can take a lot of practice.
Image


Chain Lightups
To light a cig using the burning embers of another cig.
Image

Smoking with large breasts
Not much to practice here, if you got em, flaunt em.




AusNick
Friend
ImageImage


Image

Posts: 15Image

Post by AusNick on Oct 20, 2020 2:53:10 GMT

Excellent work Dan, I should drop in here more often.



Post by Dan on Oct 21, 2020 14:18:24 GMT

Thanks. Its still Work In Progress but with so many images falling off the internet recently, I dont have time to keep updating it.
Previous topicNext topic